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Moment of Silence Legislation Introduced In New York City Council

Councilman Chaim Deutsch (D-Brooklyn) introduced a resolution into the New York City Council following the Lubavitcher Rebbe’s directive calling upon the New York State Legislature to pass, and the Governor to sign, legislation requiring a moment of silence in all public schools at the beginning of each school day.

The text of the resolution reads in part: “Whereas, Moments of silence are observed at the beginning of school across the country as a secular, non-sectarian way for students (and faculty) to meditate, reflect, set goals, or engage in any other silent, positive activity…Whereas, Requiring all public schools to observe a moment of silence has the potential to positively impact students’ academic and behavioral progress; now, therefore, be it..”

Deutsch said, “Data has shown that the moment of silence provides a unique outlet for children and adults. It’s a time to focus inward, to relax, and to momentarily get away from troubles and stress. I am excited to bring this resolution forward and urge the State to pass this law.”

Rabbi Shmuel Butman, Director of the Lubavitch Youth Organization said, “”We strongly applaud the efforts of Councilman Deutsch as this is something the Lubavitcher Rebbe spoke about many times. It will give all individuals regardless of race, religion, color or cread a chance to reflect on what is good and noble and make this world a better place.”

David Mandel, CEO of OHEL Children’s Home and Family Services said, “Legislation to encourage students to have a moment of silence comes at a good time. Stress and anxiety have permeated our lives at every age. Not only caused by the advent of social media but encompassing life as we know it is faster more intense with greater challenges albeit potentially more rewarding. A moment of silence is a good easy tool to teach youngsters at all ages that they can set their own pace without feeling pressured to do it all.”

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